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微信现金赚钱捕鱼The King and I – From ‘Getting to Know You’ to ‘Shall We Dance?’, the 1950s Rodgers and Hammerstein musical still hits the right note

The King and I (4 stars)

  • Kelly Apter
  • 21 October 2019

The King and I

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From ‘Getting to Know You’ to ‘Shall We Dance?’, the 1950s Rodgers and Hammerstein musical still hits the right note

Is it OK to like The King and I? Let’s hope so, because this lavish production is extremely likeable.

Set in Siam (now Thailand) in 1860, the musical is not without its political and cultural sensitivities. A forward-thinking, liberal English teacher takes up a position with the Siamese royal family, and essentially teaches them the error of their backward-thinking, eastern, misogynist ways. Hmmm.

At least now the lead role of the King of Siam is played by an Asian actor (unlike Yul Bryner in the film and early theatrical productions), and the introduction of Act Two opening number ‘Western People Funny’ (dropped from the film) offers something of a counterbalance.

Because western people are indeed funny, with their big hooped skirts, uncomfortable shoes, pinned up hair and make-up – something the King’s wives are quick to point out when they’re asked to dress European for a night. But there is plenty of wit of another kind, with The King and I bringing home many more laughs than your average musical.

Annalene Beechey as school teacher Anna Leonowens is an absolute joy. Strong of voice and will, yet gentle of spirit and in complete control of the 40-metre wide, 40lbs dress she swings round the stage during ‘Shall We Dance?’. The way she and the equally strong Jose Llana as the King of Siam play around with language has the crowd eating out of their palms.

Meanwhile, Paulina Yeung and Ethan Le Phong as would-be lovers Lun Tha and Tuptim take us into their hearts with powerful vocals and a real sense of longing. And the King’s children are, as expected, utterly adorable and well worth getting to know.

No expense has been spared on this production – the ornate head gear alone covers your ticket price. Opulent, perfectly executed and a feast for the eyes, The King and I may hark back to a different era but its capacity to entertain hasn’t diminished one bit.

Reviewed at Edinburgh Playhouse. Currently touring until April 2020.

斗地主捕鱼支付宝提现金Hot Chip, Barrowland, Glasgow, Sat 19 Oct

Hot Chip, Barrowland, Glasgow, Sat 19 Oct (5 stars)

  • Craig Angus
  • 21 October 2019

Hot Chip, Barrowland, Glasgow, Sat 19 Oct

credit: Ronald Dick

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Cult favourites return to Glasgow with a life-affirming set of soulful electronica

There’s a celebratory feel to Hot Chip’s set tonight. The fabled ballroom floor has an extra spring, pounded relentlessly by a Glasgow audience that’s in perpetual motion for the duration. Why so special? Underrated cult favourites tour in support of their well-received but not especially hip seventh album. Devoted fans turn out in force, casual fans are won over, everyone goes home (or to the Subby) happy and the world keeps turning. To reduce such a jubilant occasion to this dry analysis would be to eliminate the romance from the performance and miss the essence of what makes popular music such an important thing – in short, an absolute sin.

Times are hard, turbulent and unce最新10元起捕鱼现金版rtain, the country never more divided. Hot Chip are a shot in the arm tonight, a technicolour adrenaline rush that’s a reminder of the privilege of enjoying music, the togetherness, the escapism, the community. It’s all there in ‘Melody of Love’, which asks ‘do you have faith to feel in this world?’, before offering a consoling arm round the shoulder. ‘All you need is here, it’s moving in the air / All you need to hear, beyond this blue despair’.

Tonight’s set focuses on the aforementioned new record, which forms the backbone of the night without dominating proceedings. ‘Hungry Child’ grows into a first-class floor filler, ‘Spell’ bewitches with a vocoder call-and-response and, fleshed out with live drums and a throbbing baseline, ‘Positive’ is one of the standout tracks of the night, a plea for unity, understanding and compassion set to a classic disco tune.

The remainder is testament to Hot Chip’s enduring back catalogue (only debut album Coming on Strong isn’t represented). ‘Huarache Lights’ is a majestic opening track, its ominous call to ‘replace us with the things that do the job better’ made to look ridiculous by the band’s skill and humanity. The swaggering ‘Flutes’ gets a rapturous reception, with Owen Clarke (who’s a turbo charged, strutting presence throughout), Al Doyle (in a fetching, wide brimmed hat) and Rob Smoughton (who covers every inch of the stage) joining Alexis Taylor in a choreographed routine that’s an infectious piece of simple showmanship – this must be a rather enjoyable band to be part of. ‘And I Was A Boy From School’ gets a massive singalong too, Joe Goddard taking a well-earned swig of his Buckfast at its climax.

The night should peak with the pre-encore run of ‘Over and Over’, ‘Melody of Love’ and ‘Ready For The Floor’, but the band emerge for one last hurrah – a riotous version of the Beastie Boy’s ‘Sabotage’ and the euphoric closer ‘I Feel Better’. A flawless show from one of Britain’s greatest modern bands, and a hell of a Saturday night.

捕鱼王者现金苹果版Steven Wilson announces two UK shows, find out how to get tickets

Steven Wilson announces two UK shows, find out how to get tickets

  • Becki Crossley
  • 21 October 2019

Steven Wilson announces two UK shows, find out how to get tickets

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Prog-rock legend set to perform huge Nottingham and London shows in September 2020

Steven Wilson has announced he will perform live at the Motorpoint Arena in Nottingham on Thu 17 Sep 2020 and The O2 Arena in London on Sat 19 Sep 2020. Tickets for the shows are available at 10am on Fri 25 Oct.

Steven Wilson is best known as the founder, lead guitarist, lead vocalist and songwriter of the prog-rock band Porcupine注册送6元体验金币的现金捕鱼 Tree. Since his first solo album Insurgentes in 2008 Wilson has been a successful solo artist with a discography five records deep.

His last solo album To The Bone came out in 2017, just one achievement in his three-decade career. Wilson is one of the UK’s most prolific prog-rock artists, earning critical acclaim during his time in Porcupine Tree and collaborative band Storm Corrosion.

Steven Wilson’s musical honours include four Grammy Award nominations and, in 2015, he received three awards at the Progressive Music Awards in London for his services to the genre, where he was crowned ‘the king of prog rock’. Hear the king live and loud in Nottingham and London next September as part of The Future Bites tour.

Steven Wilson 2020 UK shows:
Thu 17 Sep – Motorpoint Arena, Nottingham
Sat 19 Sep – The O2 Arena, London

Tickets for Steven Wilson’s Nottingham and London shows go on sale at 10am on Fri 25 Oct.

现金捕鱼游戏漏洞The Last Black Man in San Francisco review

The Last Black Man in San Francisco (5 stars)

  • Allan Hunter
  • 21 October 2019

The Last Black Man in San Francisco

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Irresistible and emotional drama from Joe Talbot that acts as a fond elegy for the titular city

‘You don’t get to hate it, unless you love it,’ Jimmie Fails proudly declares to a newcomer who dares to find fault with his beloved San Francisco. The Last Black Man in San Francisco is a fond elegy for a city that is slipping from view, like a half-remembered dream in the first light of day.

Inspired by true events in the lives of star Jimmie Fails and director Joe Talbot, this beautifully photographed, hugely impressive debut feature focuses on Jimmie’s obsession with regaining ownership of the Victorian home that his grandfather built in the heart of the city. Jimmie is so in love with the house that he even keeps trying to restore it, much to the annoyance of the current owners. When a dispute over an estate leaves the house temporarily empty, Jimmie take ownership, moving in with his best friend and aspiring playwright Mont (Jonathan Majors).

This is a film in which a house is so much more than a home – it is a legacy, a symbol of continuity in a rapidly changing world and a reflection of the way the city has fallen victim to gentrification. Those who might once have lived in the neighbourhood have been pushed further to the margins.

The Last Black Man in San Francisco has the same generosity of spirit and tenderness that Barry Jenkins brought to the Oscar-winning Moonlight. The central story is precise and particular but also serves to shine light on a whole range of interconnected themes, from the bonds of friendship to the ties of family, definitions of masculinity, the class divide in modern America and how to cherish dreams and when to let them go. There手机现金棋牌捕鱼游戏大厅 is so much emotion bubbling just under the surface of every little triumph and crushing setback that the end result is irresistible.

General release from Fri 25 Oct.

苹果手机下载现金捕鱼游戏Black and Blue review – Cliched cop thriller starring Naomie Harris that’s elevated by anger and empathy

Black and Blue (3 stars)

  • Emma Simmonds
  • 21 October 2019

Black and Blue

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Cliched cop thriller starring Naomie Harris that’s elevated by anger and empathy

A rookie cop becomes the centre of a racially-charged storm in this incendiary action thriller from Deon Taylor (The Intruder). Diverging from its otherwise quite commercial, sometimes crass tendencies, Black and Blue delivers a sustained and savage attack on an institutionally racist police force. With diligent work from Naomie Harris as the officer in question and a righteous regard for neglected communities, it’s elevated and energised by its empathy and anger.

Harris plays Alicia West, a recently qualified officer returning to New Orleans after an extended period of absence, including two tours of duty in Afghanistan. This former juvenile offender knows the streets she now patrols and is committed to building bridges between the black community and the boys (and girls) in blue, despite disinterest from both sides.

However, when she witnesses corrupt narcs, led by Frank Grillo’s Terry Malone, assassinate a trio of young drug dealers – an incident caught on her body cam – Alicia is forced into hiding in her old neighbourhood. Framed as the perpetrator, she’s hunted by the police and her former community, with Mike Colter’s ferocious criminal kingpin Darius leading the civilian charge. The only way to clear her name is to fight her way out.

Although there are explosions of exciting action and suspenseful hide-and-seeks, this lacks the properly immersive, you-are-there camerawork of the similar End of Watch, but Alicia’s personal connection to the area and the hostilities between ‘black’ and ‘blue’ make for an interesting conflict.

British screenwriter Peter A Dowling (who co-wrote high-flying hokum Flightplan, starring Jodie Foster) doesn’t show any great insight or subtlety but he captures a sense of fear and frustration that’s further enhanced by the lead performances. Harris is believably gutsy, isolated and torn and Tyrese Gibson (best known as the Fast & Furious franchise’s resident wisecracker) is a 捕鱼大师微信现金版credibly conflicted sidekick as Milo ‘Mouse’ Jackson; a scene where Mouse calls the police for help, only to be manhandled and humiliated by bully boy officers adds a note of quiet pathos.

Given the film’s compassion for those left to make their own rules, the cartoon villains are jarring (both Grillo and Colter have done excellent work elsewhere, in The Purge: Anarchy and Luke Cage respectively), while Taylor is certainly no stranger to cliches. Nevertheless, context matters and it’s hard not to care as Black and Blue takes a Fugitive-style thriller and drops it into a simmering pot of racial tension.

General release from Fri 25 Oct.

棋牌游戏现金捕鱼Monos review – Unforgettable South American drama which follows a group of teenage soldiers

Monos (5 stars)

  • Nikki Baughan
  • 21 October 2019

Monos

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Unforgettable South American drama which follows a group of teenage soldiers

Distilling the ancient horrors of war through the experiences of a group of teenage soldiers, the Colombia-shot Monos is a truly masterful exploration of the relentless inhumanity of battle and the hostilities of adolescence. Displaying both a narrative poignancy and a bravura level of craft, it’s one of the most unforgettable films of the year.

On top of a mountain in an unnamed Latin American country, as a largely unseen civil war rages beneath them, a rag-tag team of male and female guerrilla soldiers – including Moises Arias’s Bigfoot and Sofia Buenaventura’s Rambo – have been tasked with guarding an American hostage, Doctora (Julianne Nicholson).

Occasionally visited by a physically diminutive superior from ‘The Organisation’, Mensajero (Wilson Salazar), who puts them through brutal drills and reminds them sharply of their responsibilities, they are otherwise left to their own devices – which largely involves drinking, drugs and dancing. When they are ordered down into a jungle base-camp, where Doctora becomes even more determined to escape, loyalties begin to break down.

Director and co-writer Alejandro Landes (who penned the restrained screenplay with Alexis Dos Santos) provides no social or political context for the events unravelling on screen. Location, time, loyalties outside the immediate group are all abstract concepts; the soldiers don’t have any coherent uniform, and certainly don’t seem to understand what they are fighting for – only that they must. Framed in this way, Monos beco现金捕鱼平台网上打鱼mes a primal, chaotic portrait of the indelible impact of conflict on a person’s soul and psyche.

Stunning cinematography from Jasper Wolf follows this inevitable loss of innocence. The focus slowly narrows from widescreen vistas at the mountain top – where the soldiers are often silhouetted against the dreamlike expanse of the horizon – to the dirty, sweaty, deadly claustrophobia of the jungle camp – where faces caked with mud peer from the screen, eyes bright with fear.

Equally as immersive is Mica Levi’s elemental score which, though sparse, elevates the film: timpani rumble like thunder over the horizon, electronic beats both speak to the apparent freedom of a life without typical adult supervision, and serve as a melancholic reminder of the carefree youth being denied to these kids. It works in harmony with the textural, evocative sound design by Lena Esquenazi and Javier Umpierrez, which makes expert use of the location – the call of birds, the snap of twigs, insistent distant gunshots – to bring an almost mystical, otherworldly quality to the film, and also bed these characters into their hellish isolation.

And this group is not just facing the alienation of war, but also the unmooring of adolescence. As well as fighting, they must contend with flushes of desire, jealousy, hormone-and-drink-fuelled rage – and all without any compassionate guidance. They are, at first, their own family, a close-knit wolfpack who look after their own; the energy and chemistry radiating from this exceptional young cast of professionals and newcomers is immediately infectious. The idea that these bonds could be broken by circumstances outside of their limited control is utterly devastating.

Selected release from Fri 25 Oct.

欢乐捕鱼真钱打鱼By the Grace of God review – François Ozon’s forensic look at sexual abuse in the Catholic Church is one of his best films

By the Grace of God (4 stars)

  • James Mottram
  • 21 October 2019

By the Grace of God

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François Ozon’s forensic look at sexual abuse in the Catholic Church is one of his best films

François Ozon continues his remarkably diverse and prolific career with one of his best films, By the Grace of God. His eighteenth feature is unli彩贝现金捕鱼游戏官方ke any other film he’s made. Already dubbed ‘the French Spotlight‘, it shares similarities to Tom McCarthy’s 2015 Oscar-winner about sexual abuse in the Catholic Church. Ozon offers up a comparably forensic examination – but the focus is not on investigative reporters, but the victims.

As ripped from the headlines as they come – two of the main perpetrators have faced trial already this year – there is a real urgency to the story, skillfully handled by Ozon who, as usual, also scripts. It begins in 2014 with 40-year-old banking exec Alexandre (Melvil Poupaud), who – like many others – was molested back in his youth by local priest Father Bernard Preynat (Bernard Verley). Remarkably, still a devout Catholic, this buttoned-up family man decides to take action, confronting Cardinal Barbarin (François Marthouret), the Archbishop of Lyon.

While Preynat admits to his crimes, the statute of limitations means it’s difficult to prosecute him, and, though the Church hierarchy feigns concern, there is little willingness to pursue it further. But gradually news of Alexandre’s case reaches other victims, notably atheist François (Denis Ménochet), who – when he discovers that Preynat is still working with children – is adamant that this story must be exposed in the press.

Ozon’s penchant to pass the narrative baton means a third figure, the jobless and sometimes violent Emmanuel (Swann Arlaud) comes into play – though his story feels more contrived. Largely, it’s a scrupulously researched procedural that grips throughout its 137-minute running time. Occasional flashpoints – a dinner table argument between François’s family, for example – add to the trauma. What results is a film that, like Spotlight, strikes a significant blow against a formerly untouchable institution.

Selected release from Fri 25 Oct.

现金捕鱼游戏平台可提现Chained for Life review – The representation of disability and disfigurement is explored with empathy by Aaron Schimberg

Chained for Life (4 stars)

  • Katherine McLaughlin
  • 21 October 2019

Chained for Life

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The representation of disability and disfigurement is explored with empathy by Aaron Schimberg

The perpetuation of negative stereotypes when it comes to any type of minority is an ongoing discussion that deserves a nuanced approach. Tackling the representation of disability and disfigurement in cinema, filmmaker Aaron Schimberg does just that with 捕鱼兑换现金上下分a multi-layered drama that doesn’t lean on obvious outrage.

The considered interactions between his players reveal a tricky cinematic history, with direct references to Tod Brownings’ 1932 landmark Freaks and Jim Sheridan’s Oscar-winning My Left Foot, among many others. From exploitation for shock value to valuable sensitive portrayals, condescending inspirational porn and the lazy trope of facial scarring as an indicator of evil (something which the BFI has refused to fund anymore) there’s lots to mull over.

Writer-director Schimberg uses a film within a film construct which not only blurs the line between fantasy and reality to gorgeously dreamy and woozily melancholic ends, but also cannily gauges the mood behind the scenes in a similar way to François Truffaut’s Day for Night. As the cast and crew of a 1940s-era production get to grips with their assigned roles, themes of consent, cruelty and confidence rise to the fore. Jess Weixler (Teeth) stars as a well-meaning actress playing a blind woman alongside Adam Pearson (Under the Skin), who plays her onscreen love interest. They’re guided by a pretentious German director (Charlie Korsmo), whose inspirations range from Orson Welles to The Muppet Movie.

Chained for Life locates the humour in absurd assumptions and ableist attitudes that certain filmmakers have adopted to those who they consider other. It conveys empathy without providing easy answers, pokes fun at beauty standards, and even targets critics making points about the value of people telling their own stories.

Limited release from Fri 25 Oct.

星力手机现金捕鱼The Addams Family review – Charlize Theron and Oscar Isaac lend their voices to this respectful but less than lush animated reboot for the ghoulish clan

The Addams Family (3 stars)

  • Eddie Harrison
  • 21 October 2019

The Addams Family

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Charlize Theron and Oscar Isaac lend their voices to this respectful but less than lush animated reboot for the ghoulish clan

‘With Snoop Dogg as Cousin It’ is the kind of credit that may horrify fans of the previous incarnations of The Addams Family; created by American cartoonist Charles Addams in 1938 for The New Yorker, they hit television back in 1964 and were rebooted for film in the 1990s. But friends of the family need not worry: hair-mountain Cousin It doesn’t enter the action until late on, and speaks only through squeaks, so the rapper’s stunt-casting doesn’t distract from this respectful, if dispiritingly vanilla computer-animated version.

Greg Tiernan and Conrad Vernon’s film begins with an origin story, depicting young Morticia (voiced by Charlize Theron) preparing for her wedding to Gomez Addams (Oscar Isaac). Torch-bearing villagers break up their romantic idyll, and the couple swiftly relocate to New Jersey – where ‘no one would be caught dead’. Their five-fingered pet Thing is joined by butler Lurch (played by Vernon), Uncle Fester (Nick Kroll) and, within a few years, two children, Wednesday (Chloë Grace Moretz) and Pugsley (Stranger Things‘ Finn Wolfhard). But the family’s values are tested when reality TV host and busy-body Margaux Needler (Allison Janney) takes on the Addams family as part of her gentrification of the area.

The best gags in this new version update classic jokes: the furious villagers are now controlled via social media fake news, while Wednesday appears identically wan in every one of her friend’s Instagram filters. The family predilection for using dangerous weapons survives intact, even if the darkly Gothic spirit of the Barry Sonnenfeld films is largely missing.

The standard of the animation, however, is less than lush, and doesn’t sit 799捕鱼能换现金well in comparison with most recent studio releases, such as the similar Hotel Transylvania franchise. But, with a decent voice cast and a style that pays homage to the original drawings, The Addams Family passes muster as a disconcertingly cheerful, family-friendly romp.

General release from Fri 25 Oct.

捕鱼送分现金下载Watchmen, Sky Atlantic – An astonishing visual and narrative treatment of a classic graphic novel which brings it crashing superbly into the contemporary world

Watchmen, Sky Atlantic (5 stars)

  • Murray Robertson
  • 18 October 2019

Watchmen, Sky Atlantic

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An astonishing visual and narrative treatment of a classic graphic novel which brings it crashing superbly into the contemporary world

Watchmen, the seminal comic book by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons, has long been considered unfilmable. Zack Snyder took a decent punt at it with his big-screen adaptation in 2009 which was visually arresting if only superficially faithful. The story has been crying out for the lengthy running time of a multi-episode TV series to let it breathe, ideally bolstered by a generous budget and considerable talent.

Thankfully, showrunner Damon Lindelof (Lost, The Leftovers) has joined forces with HBO to create a startling, almost flawless piece of work that pays homage to its source material while telling a mostly brand new story set within the same universe. While most of the original characters are sidelined in favour of a fresh set of participants, the fundamental essence of Watchmen remains intact. A story about reluctant heroes donning masks t现金捕鱼1 2o tackle systemic injustice to the chagrin of the establishment they represent, it acts as a conspicuous examination of the fractured state of current US (and world) politics.

Set in Tulsa, Oklahoma in an alternative 2019, a group of white supremacists called The Seventh Cavalry breaks a ceasefire with local law enforcement. Following this outbreak of violence, we follow Angela Abar (Regina King), a local police officer who also operates under the secret guise of Sister Night, determined to mete out justice in a world where vigilantism is not just forbidden but is being specifically targeted by the FBI. An encounter with a mysterious old man (Louis Gossett Jr) sets Abar off on a painful journey through her own ancestry, a past that’s bursting with secrecy and contemporary relevance. Flashbacks and other devices are used to flesh out both her personal history and the foundations upon which the broader narrative rests.

Abar later finds herself under the close watch of federal agent Laurie Blake (Jean Smart, playing the daughter of Silk Spectre and The Comedian from the source novel), while we also meet fellow officer Looking Glass (Tim Blake Nelson) whose decision to wear a mirrored mask is explained in one of the series’ most astonishing scenes. Elsewhere, Jeremy Irons chews all the scenery he can consume as the mysterious Adrian Veidt, a wonderfully unpredictable Promethean character with shades of Howard Hughes.

Despite the story’s vast scope, Lindelof successfully binds his various loose threads which tangle around time, space and other dimensions. Shocking revelations are frequently inverted by the very next chapter, but it never exploits your investment as an impressive logic underpins the whole. Helpfully, Lindelof’s script is brought to life by an exceptional cast. King, hot from her Oscar win for If Beale Street Could Talk, brings to life a fascinatingly complex character whose fragile existence is in constant flux. And Jean Smart clearly relished her role as a federal agent who takes sadistic pleasure in her sport of apprehending vigilantes, despite their categorically noble intentions.

Never forgetting the source material, Watchmen is visually captivating, most notably in the numerous flashbacks which employ audacious match cuts to segue between past and present. An electric score, by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross, drives the occasional bursts of action with a mesmerising, percussive thrum, while a suite of contemporaneous songs lends pathos and subtext. In crafting his own story, Lindelof has conjured up something quite extraordinary and, for a first season, remarkably ambitious. Watchmen is a bravura piece of television which takes the best elements from its source material and repurposes them into a fascinating allegory for the present day.

Episodes watched: 6 of 9

Watchmen starts on Sky Atlantic, Monday 21 October, 9pm.

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